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Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Time for Gardening

It's time to visit my lakeside garden, to stretch those black tarps, weed, plant, fertilize, mulch, worry about winds, cloudy days, soil too soggy, soil too sandy.

It's time to bend and stretch and haul.

All tools will be sharpened and used, including hubby's big tractor. 

The big broken branches will be carried to the burn pile that never gets burned, and the small branches will be mulched.

We planted a dozen blueberry bushes last year. They might bloom and produce this year if I fertilize them in time and mulch carefully to prevent weed invasion and root choking.  The pear tree is in bloom, and its companions will follow soon. 

The soil is sandy, leached by the constant rains.  It will need heaps of composted matter to be added and tilled in.  Worms will come to my aid and the first ray of sunshine will welcome my soiled hands as I dig carefully to position those pea seeds and fava seeds deep down.  By June, I will harvest the peas and favas and follow with squash and cucumbers. 

I'm still learning after seven years in the northwest marine climate how to coax growth when temperatures do not get above 60's in the middle of what everyone calls summer. 

Yet, in the middle of December, when I pull out a frozen bag of favas from the freezer, peel their outer husk and add them to my slowly sauteed onions, those cool days of summer return in their splendor, in the buttery taste of those favas, a taste so  flavorful and soulfull, I'm transported to my childhood days, and an Easter meal Mother would prepare. 

It's time to plant and grow. Time for renewal and celebrations.

18 comments:

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

I am so hungry to get my hands in the dirt, but it is still way too cold here. We are in for a later than usual Spring!

Maggie May said...

It is good to plan this years crops and look forward with anticipation to the warmer weather.

Nuts in May

Pseudonymous High School Teacher said...

I loved this post. I am planning my first garden ever this year. A friend gave me a whole bunch of old magazines. Another friend is giving me tips from her experiences. I don't know a single thing, but I am very excited with the idea of eating produce that I grew in my own yard.

You have made favas a must from this post.

Ocean Girl said...

Time for serious gardening!

Looking forward to your crop.

Wander to the Wayside said...

I'm exhausted just reading about it! But what a fine exhaustion it will be when my time comes...

Brian Miller said...

blue beries would be amazing...we have a grape arbor and pear trees...love fruit fresh off the tree...

decomondo said...

Beautiful post, lakeviewer. I love gardening so much!
It wasn’t so when I was younger; I discovered the “real” gardening and virtues of organic farming in Italy, in the middle of the vineyards and olive grove. I've learned from my father-in-law who was very much ahead in that.
Now I can't wait for Spring to come, to admire again the life cycle miracle, to spend the whole day just in the middle of it.
Your post made me think it’s time to go back to Italy; I hope that the Sun will wait for me there, as the winds are still icy here…

Adoro le fave fresche con olio, pepe e pecorino :)

Sniffles and Smiles said...

"Yet, in the middle of December, when I pull out a frozen bag of favas from the freezer, peel their outer husk and add them to my slowly sauteed onions, those cool days of summer return in their splendor, in the buttery taste of those favas, a taste so flavorful and soulfull, I'm transported to my childhood days, and an Easter meal Mother would prepare..." This is pure poetry, dear Rosaria! In fact, the entire post has a poetic rhythm to it!! Simply beautiful! ~Janine XO

Eleonora said...

I agree with everyone, especially Janine. I love your embedded poetry, your call to reflection and deep thought. You may open talking blissfully about a garden, but you actually are digging deep into the growth of soul, mind and inner self.


Grazie Maestra, come sempre.
Lola xxxxxxx

Tabor said...

I have recently discovered that there is nothing as delicious as a carrot cake made from garden picked carrots. I am sure this is true of so many other things as well.

becky at abbeystyle said...

Oh, would that I had a garden to till for food! My garden is nothing but decoratives for shade and privacy, a fruit tree here or there but there's no real reason to dig and haul.
Green with envy,
Becky XX

Eva Gallant said...

I gardened in my youth; now I rely on the farmers' market! But more power to you!

Natalie said...

Nothing like the soul connection we make when gardening.......

Cloudia said...

Lovely post. Ciao & Aloha from Hawaii my Friend!


Comfort Spiral

Enchanted Oak said...

I'm still catching up on weeds everywhere in the yard, in all of my garden areas. As I grow weary of digging out each weed, and feel like quitting, I remind myself how wonderful it feels to accomplish such a vast task. It seems overwhelming in the beginning, but with steady work, one area at a time, the insurmountable becomes a victory. I'll think of you in your garden as I work...

Dimple said...

I haven't had a vegetable garden in many years. But I have been enjoying (!) time in my yard, raking up the detritus of winter. Last year at this time there was still snow on the ground...

She Writes said...

I will miss a garden the most!

Bagman and Butler said...

This sounds so great! The excitement of making things grow, gardening, tilling the soil...
Unfortunately, I haven't figured out how to enjoy yardwork yet. I'm the backyard scrooge, secretly envying my wife and neighbors while muttering "bah, humbug" at my mower.