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Thursday, October 22, 2009

Learning to do nothing: A year later.




February 17, 2004

Much time has passed. Doing nothing is easier-a lot of floating through days and weeks, trying to find direction, punctuated by visits from relatives, holidays' get together, trips up and down the coast and out of state.

After Christmas, we flew to Florida with a stop in New Orleans, our Christmas gift to each other. It was good to get away in the middle of rainy season, but disappointing as well. New Orleans was too "packaged" this time. We stuck to the recommendations from the hotel concierge. The driver from the hotel seemed to be reciting well-rehearsed jokes for us tourists.  We didn't feel the excitement and raw energy of our first visit back in 77 when we walked all night, with two children in tow, visiting jazz clubs and hearing the greatest music we had ever heard.  Streets were crowded with people of all ages, and we were not worried about our safety in the least.  Even Cafe du Monde looked lame and scrubbed this time. 

Maybe it's us.

Florida too felt different. Nothing like the Florida we knew in our college days, the running around Key West at all hours, barefoot and penniless.  Now, everything was expensive; everyone, older than us.  I don't remember old people at all when we spent vacations down here in the 70's, down from Tallahassee with our two children and term papers to complete, spending time on  boats, fishing for our supper.  I loved Key West.  It didn't hurt that I was working on my thesis related to  Papa Hemingway. 

We must have clearer goals when we travel. I'm glad too that we didn't rush to buy the motor home. It would be cumbersome and cramped and totally an eye sore after a while.

Days float by.  Instead of jobs, we have appointments with doctors, dentists, surgeons and testing clinics.  How did we get these appointments in when we worked fifty hours a week and drove 120 miles a day?

Hubby has volunteered to coach baseball.  I work with a non-profit. We're meeting people and beginning to be accepted.

The best part about retirement is the feeling that your day is yours to do what you like.  We have coffee and read papers in bed for hours.  Everyday feels like a new start, full of possibilities.


One of these days, I wish to find a passion so deep that will make me jump out in the morning and dream deeply at night. For now, I'll practice patience and contentment.

26 comments:

Gran said...

"For now, I'll practice patience and contentment."

That's a wonderful sentence, and this is a great post.

Crystal Jigsaw said...

Contentment is all you need, the rest follows.

CJ xx

Carol @ TheWritersPorch said...

Rosaria, this was so good! :0

Renee said...

My favourite blog post of the week dear one. I just love it.

Maybe it is us? I love that.

By the way Halloween is what I like the least about October.

Love Renee xoxo

RNSANE said...

I have to agree with you about the great New Orleans music! I loved going to nursing school there from 1962 t0 1965 - stayed there for a few years after since most of my classmates married Charity docs...but, though I was from GA, living in the South wasn't for me..too much bigotry of all sorts so I headed north to Boston, then west to the San Francisco area, after a couple of years in Tampa.

I've always been a bit restless but happy to return home to the Bay area, the Golden Gate Bridge and the liberal politics. I miss Dixieland jazz and Gulf oysters but my friends are still in the New Orleans area. It saddens me, though, that so long after Katrina, a major city in our country is still far from repair.

I'm a long way from patience and contentment. Share your accomplishments as you succeed. I need help in the worst way.

Brian Miller said...

Everyday feels like a new start, full of possibilities...words to live by...

m. heart said...

I'm loving these glimpses into your past.

potsoc said...

So doing nothing (sort of) has grown unto you, eh? Turns out doing nothing is, in fact, doing other things that we, at times, did not even suspect we could do. Openness and availability are the keys to a wonderfull world of near doing nothing at our very own pace.

Maggie May said...

There is nothing quite like having the day to oneself.
Only happens to me during school holidays and even then, sometimes not!

Nuts in May

Eva Gallant said...

I have to agree, there's nothing like knowing the day is yours to do with what you will!

Natalie said...

I would be so excited to start the day in such a wonderful way. My idea of Heaven. :D

Elizabeth Bradley said...

I like to go to new places, I've experienced exactly what you have when I return to a place I adored. I go to the same place for one reason, if I'm going to visit a love one. I love reading your journal, so wonderfully written.

Hit 40 said...

A passion to pop out of bed...

blogging honestly helps me get up in the morning. I love to see what people commented on my blog. Very addictive.

Retirement sounds like heaven to me :-)

Ribbon said...

I'm learning a lot from these posts... about you and also about us... people :)

xx best wishes Ribbon

Bogey said...

I guess even retirement takes some getting used to. We get to a certain age where we look forward to the day where we have fulfilled our working commitment. And then, when it is upon us, we are puzzled by all of the extra time that is at our disposal. Patience and contentment indeed.

NitWit1 said...

You have eloquently described aspects with which I too am sruggling. I have several "passions" but I, only I, must discover the method by which I express/use it with my personal limitations.

With the advancing years I an urgency to also make some passion inclusive of my husband, and that is very possible.

Shadow said...

i sense such peace in your settling in...

Reasons said...

It all sounds pretty good to me. I hope the passion you seek comes soon.

the walking man said...

Finding the new things to be passionate about, as we age, seems to be harder and easier.

Fire Byrd said...

And what could possibly better than contentment and coffee.
Life sounds good.
xx

Gaston Studio said...

Fabulous post Rosario, but your last line, "For now, I'll practice patience and contentment." has such deep meaning for me.

Tiffany Norris said...

Thank you for these posts! And thank you for the reminder to practice patience and contentment. Much-needed and appreciated.

Rose Marie Raccioppi said...

Everything "IS" - it may take a lifetime or more to appreciate the totality of our BEING. May what was, echo its loving refrain and bring you to bask in the joy of this moment present.

In loving friendship,
Rose Marie

The Things We Carried said...

I try sometimes to return to the places I remember. Often they no longer exist and I wonder, is it me... My husband is right there with me!

Marguerite said...

My passion is life itself. So many wonders to explore and experience. I have felt the same way about places that I have visited in my youth and revisit now. Just a different perspective now. Thoughtful post.

Man of Roma said...

Interesting and inspiring. After all, life is like an art - the art of living .
And every art is taught by example.