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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

My Town at the end of 2010.

Port Orford is a sleepy little town, a fishing town, a once logging town, now home to retirees, ranchers, reformed Californians, spiritualists and artists.
Yes, artists, and writers, and retired CEO and scientists, and CIA experts.
There are more galleries here than restaurants.
More churches than real-estate offices.
The entire town is only a couple of miles long, with U.S. Highway 101 right in the middle, moving North to Alaska, South to Mexico. All around, hills and enclaves, three wild rivers providing recreational opportunities and food for those who are patient and are willing to plumb its riches, and a historical park where the first soldiers fought and were decimated by the native population, with dire consequences on both sides. There is a native curse on this town, not because of that original battle, but because of the subsequent retaliation and immure actions of the government against all native populations.

The town has about 1200 residents, 700 full time, with a volunteer mayor and councilmen, an elementary school and a high school to serve the 300 plus or minus student population, of which a good 45% are on free or reduced lunches. 

There is one blinking light on the south end of town by Battle Rock Park, a storm warning light on the north end, to warn motorists when winds are  violent enough to make the south heading trip too dangerous. As I write this, the town is on wind alert.

Also: a supermarket, a convenience store, three gas stations, a video store, six restaurants, all but one on the main drag, two real-estate offices-down from six just a few years ago-, a post office, a lumber/plumbing supply store, a newspaper office, a frame store, an organic store/vegan restaurant, a car parts store, a car repair shop, a hardware store, a glass and window repair store,  four RV parks, a library, a port, a marine reserve,  the brand new  Hawthorne Gallery and  Redfish restaurant with impressive pieces, fabulous food and outstanding views.

You can walk the entire town in less than 30 minutes.  The hills, lake and river shores will take much longer.

Most people know your name here. They will stop and chat with you everywhere. Soon, you'll connect with just about every body in town.

34 comments:

Suz said...

gee...makes me want to move

Jo said...

Your town sounds wonderful...!

Eva Gallant said...

I love a small town! I wish I had known you when we drove through there in the fall of 2009.

Hope said...

sounds like a place for me!
hoping that the forces of nature will be kind to you and your town.
take care

Z said...

That is so interesting. Our village, population about 500, has a primary school and a pub. And a church. One hardware store, which supplies goods to farmers, builders and the general public, but no other shops at all. The Parish Council, of elected volunteers, meets once a month. Our poshest resident is the Queen's former Chief Equerry, but most people don't know that because he doesn't spread it about. Otherwise, we're a bit of a mixture, very down to earth country people in the main. Half an hour's drive from the sea. I used to live by the sea and miss it, but I also love it here and am settled for good, I'm sure.

Dedene said...

Your town sounds super. We have about 900 people, but don't have nearly the conveniences you do.
Happy New Year!

Terra said...

Your town sounds idyllic and thank you for telling us about it. The wind alert sounds scary though.

Retired English Teacher said...

I love your descriptions of life in your town. It sounds like a very wonderful place to live.

Sightingsat60 said...

I myself am not particularly religious, but I'd like any town that has more churches than real-estate offices!

Marilynne said...

I think I am going to have to write about my town. You have inspired me.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Janna Qualman said...

I want to visit a place just like this, I really do.

Happy New Year, Rosaria!

yaya said...

I live in a small town also, although not as lovely as yours sounds! Probably because there is no ocean views.. But it has it's charms that only small town living can bring. Now I must ask..."what? no Wal-mart?"...don't have to answer!

Arkansas Patti said...

Gosh, I thought I lived in a small town. You have me beat by about 2000 souls and two traffic lights.
I just love the simplicity and intimacy of small towns.
Think we are both lucky.

Brian Miller said...

think i might stick to the hills anr river banks...smiles. nah it sounds like a great town...

potsoc said...

You make me lonesome for Val-David where we lived so many wonderful years before reality brought us nearer our children and relative safety...in a medium town next to the big city.

Donna said...

Sounds like a village right out of a movie!! A charnming little hamlet where one would sit by the sea and write or paint. May I come be your neighbor???

ellen abbott said...

You have everything you need. I also live outside a small town, less than 10,000, and we like it so much better than the big city.

Dawn said...

This sounds like a place most of us dream of. I am sure it has its downsides as most places do....but this would be on my top 10 list of places to move!
Love the photo!!!

Woman in a Window said...

I could do that, Rosaria. I could live in a place such as that. Although to me it is a little large.

My town has one small grocery, a library, post office, hardware store, museum and little else. It's nice like this, isn't it? While I do my best to remain unknown, all know my children. I could use for more arts but otherwise, small is beautiful.

Google mapping now:)

xo
erin

Rob-bear said...

It all sounds delightful, Rosaria. I've lived in places like that, and smaller. Though, being by the ocean, it would be different from where I've been.

And it's quite different from our city of 225,000.

❥ ќʀɨsтɨиɑ said...

Hello! I was here, asking for friendship. ;) Would you like to follow each others blogs? Advance Happy New Year. :D

Trish and Rob MacGregor said...

Gee, rosaria. it sounds like a paradise.

Marguerite said...

Sounds quite charming and like a town that I lived in once, in the 70's. Batten down the hatches and stay safe!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Rosario .. sounds delightful and interesting .. and good to know about your town at the end of 2010 .. happy times for 2011 - Hilary

Phoenix said...

I think I would like to maybe live in your town one day - though perhaps that wasn't the intent of your post, as you seem to like your towns small, and if all your blogger friends moved there, it wouldn't be small anymore!

But I do love the idea of a quiet little place to spend my days. :)

Rachel Cotterill said...

I always think your area sounds wonderful :)

Amanda said...

i love the fact that your town has a storm warning light. makes life exciting.......

(not to mention the fact that your town also has cia agents??!)

the walking man said...

That sounds like about three times the size of the town i want to live in.

becky at abbeystyle said...

Sounds a bit like Venice, FL...our little historic downtown on the gulf...but a lot warmer :)

The Girl from Cherry Blossom Street said...

Fabulous food and outstanding views?
I'm good to go!

Happy New year!

Relyn said...

I was stopping by because I wanted to wish you a happy new year and thank you for being a follower of my blog. It means a lot to me. Thank you. May your new year be filled with laughter, more joy than sorrow, peace, and wisdom. Blessings to you. Happy new year!

RNSANE said...

Port Orford really does sound like a peaceful, lovely place. You are not that far, really, from Eugene and a few larger places when you wnat more of a larger town feel - is Portland the nearest big city? I keep thinking I should get in my van once I get moved the end of Feb and figure out just where I am going to live. It's all so up in the air right now.

Lizzy Frizzfrock said...

Rosaria, it sounds like a nice place to live and I for sure would love to visit it. I keep hoping. Happy new year to you & yours. I'm so glad I know you!

rosaria said...

Gee, I left out:
1. a live theater
2. a movie theater
3. three lawyers' offices
4. a laundromat
5. motels, retreats and B&B's
6. a marine research center
7. human services center
8. a clinic
9. a dental office
10.a quilting center
11. a senior center
12. a police center
13. City Hall
14. A used-car lot
15. A few antique stores
16. A drive-in espresso place

I'm probably leaving out more shops and services that I hardly frequent.

Towns are a lot more complicated than we know. I haven't even listed all the clubs and organizations that meet in Legion Halls, Art Centers, Community Buildings. I guess I have to be a whole lot more perceptive and attentive than I am.

Happy New Year everyone, wherever you are. May your get closer to fulfilling your dreams!