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Friday, November 6, 2015

What did Marcus Aurelius know?

Marcus Aurelius, (AD. 121-180) was a Roman Emperor and a philosopher. He called his writing/ thoughts "Meditations", and kept it private, even writing it in Greek, the language of the elite in Rome. Not a religious treatise, it is never the less, a spiritual journey, and it starts with paying tribute to those people who had helped him become who he was at that time, an emperor and a just man.

As I continue to search and borrow and ponder the meaning of life, especially at this juncture, when death is right around the corner for so many of us, reading the Meditations has become my own spiritual journey.

As I paid for the book at Barnes and Nobles, the young clerk looked puzzled when I told her everyone must read Meditations at every stage of their lives.




14 comments:

Friko said...

Really? Well, I’d better get on with it then. I’ve only ever read snippets quoted in other writings, but if you say it is essential reading then I must get a move on. The grim reaper has to wait until I’m done with M.A.

Thanks for pointing me in his direction. I am curious now to learn more.

erin said...

good for you, Rosaria)))

unfortunately we are too infrequently asked to think at all, unless it is in terms of profit. how we gauge profit and value in our society is for the most part a sham, a deception, lube to keep the big economical wheel turning.

I tell you, these guys had it figured out! I'm reading senancour's obermann right now and I can't believe how at home I feel with this writer who published this particular work in 1804!

I've encountered aurelius too, but only his meditations in short bursts. it would most definitely be a fruitful venture.

I've been convinced of the importance of philosophy for our children. real choice doesn't exist in any life until the options are understood. but the schools do not allow for it. and certainly it is a battle with even my own children. but I don't stop trying:)

rosaria williams said...

Friko, Erin, having time to read and write and ponder and share is the ultimate joy of retirement. Everything else pales in comparison.

The Odd Essay said...

Got curious... looked this up on Amazon... and this book is free to download on to your Kindle. so I did...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Rosaria ... yes noted your post and your readers' comments - so I followed suite and downloaded it. Loved your post ... putting life into context and that your reply comment about having time to read, write, ponder and post by sharing - seems so right. Cheers Hilary

My Life in the Charente said...

Also found it on kindle so thanks The Odd Essay, I have also downloaded it. Well done Rosaria. Have a good weekend Diane

Mac n' Janet said...

I've never read it, but I'm beginning to think I should.

Helen said...

I do believe you have launched a movement! Off to open my Kindle. And download.

Dr. Kathy McCoy said...

You've inspired me, Rosaria! That's a must read -- something I've always meant to read and never have. I'll remedy that soon. You're right that this phase of life doesn't leave a lot of room for procrastination!

the walking man said...

I am a literary reader Rosaria, and perhaps I should pick up "Meditations." Yet I have no more reason to question life and the purpose of it for there is no guarantee that my conclusions would be correct. I like the mythology of Charon and the Elysian Fields beyond the Styx, I would like to think I have been honorable enough to be able to have the boatman accept my coins and ferry me over.

Velva said...

I have put this book on my reading list. Thank you!

Velva

Retired English Teacher said...

Well, alright then. I guess I must get the book. I've been trying to get through The Confessions of St. Augustine. I find I don't have the patience to wade through the language of St. Augustine. To be more correct, I'm not trying to read his work in Greek. I'm just trying to read it in antiquated English. There was a day I loved to do such things, but I've either become very lazy, or I have lost brain power. Read on.

A Cuban In London said...

You see, now I have to check that book out. I had heard of the title but never really considered reading it. The one book I would recommend everyone should read at least three times in their lives is The Little Prince. As a child, as a young adult and as a mature adult.

Greetings from London.

Down by the sea said...

That's a wonderful view with the sea in the distance. Sarah x