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Saturday, February 7, 2015

Waiting for the next storm.

My husband is a good sport, indulging me in so many ways, even posing for this picture the day before the first February storm hit town. No, you don't hear about these Northwestern storms in the news  because though they are predictably harsh and fierce, cutting trees down, toppling sheds not pinned down, and eliminating any need to rake the lawn and driveway, they arrive with assurance and declaration after traveling for miles in the Pacific. Since few of us live on this coast, no need to worry anybody else.

This last week we had two powerful storms hitting us at 75-100 miles per hour, each lasting a few days at a time, pelting us with ferocious rain and debris to keep the hardiest of folks indoor. After such storms, the road crews are busy clearing roadways and repairing roads. We have been running errands with the full knowledge that we'd be crossing swollen rivers and creeks dangerously close to spill out on the main road, forcing us all to make hasty retreats.

In the past, before we were seniors, and before regulations changed, our pharmacist would provide us with extra meds during winter months for just such disturbances. Now, it is not easy to get extra meds for possible bad weather days.

Yesterday, between storms, we rushed out for emergency runs to get meds and groceries and were fortunate enough to make there and back without any incidences. Today, after last night's new storm, we are not sure those rivers are minding their confines. One of these days, I need to acquaint my readers with the vagaries of keeping house on such a frontier.

One would expect all kinds of life and death emergencies in these settings.
Animals seem to know these things and huddle low and out of reach. I have never seen cows or lambs battered around during these storms.

We rarely lose electricity, until yesterday, just for a half hour or so in the middle of the night; it was on when we got up and wouldn't have noticed it except for the clocks not being aligned. The bigger problem is finding out that some animal looking for warmth or shelter during such storms has found warmth under the car hood.

And so, as we canvas the property after each storm, fixing this drain, clearing debris, we also check under the car hood, or brush, hoping to rescue those caught unaware.


Hubby repairing a drainage pipe to stop further water damage to the roof.

26 comments:

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

Keep safe, I hate bad storms, luckily we do not get too many here but we have had some bad ones. Take care Diane

Hilary said...

I'm glad the storm didn't bring you too much in the way of disruption or devastation. And I love that you check for creatures in peril and in need of rescuing. Stay safe, Rosaria.

Brian Miller said...

well, glad you could get out and get those meds....we have had little to no snow...but def some wicked winds...one this week tore 3 shutters off the house....maybe we will still get snow...

Marty Damon said...

Good grief, we get all worked up here over 25 mile and hour winds!
I wish you would provide us with a bigger idea of where you are. As you say, it does sound like a frontier.

Friko said...

As if it weren’t enough that getting older brings its own problems we now have to have the elements gang up on us. As long as you yourself are safe things aren’t quite as terrible as in some areas.

There are always things to be fixed after storms; there are far more of them now than there used to be. Even here in the UK we suffer at least two or three times during winter and a few times the rest of the year. One of the problems is that our trees shed big branches and we have to make sure that all trees on our periphery are healthy enough to withstand storms.

Helen said...

Stay safe .. next time we want a video of you doing some of that maintenance ~ big grin!

We had many huge old trees downed yesterday in Bend.

joeh said...

Hunker down!

Retired English Teacher said...

You are brave soul living where you do. I'm glad you weren't without power for long. Also, I'm glad you made it back with all the necessities. Take care.

#1Nana said...

Maybe I'll rethink our plan of spending a few weeks in the RV on the southern coast of Oregon. We wanted to avoid the crowds of summer, but those winter storms might be a deal breaker! Stay safe and warm. I hope the clean up isn't too difficult.

Maggie May said...

Your storms sound horrendous.
Hoping you keep safe and that you don't get any damage to the property.
We get upset about 60mile hour wind, that occasionally hits us and the whole country is ground to a halt over thick snow!
Maggie x

Rian said...

Hope you get through the storms OK. Here in Texas, while we get the occasional artic storm... it's never like the brunt you must get living on the coast. I think that people who live where it's extremely cold or extremely hazardous are made of stronger stuff. But then, you are compensated by such beautiful scenery... and a mostly quiet peaceful environment to spend your days.

Linda Myers said...

I love the winter storms on the coast - but only if I can get to the drugstore, grocery store, etc. And if there is no danger of flooding. This year's sound a little scary.

Munir said...

We are expecting a huge storm as well. Please stay safe. Keep warm.

Tom Sightings said...

I don't mind getting a little weather (he writes, staring at the snow beginning to fall yet again); but the cleanup is a real pain ... and NO ONE wants to lose electricity!

Grandmother (Mary) said...

You are the hearty one! Stay safe and be well.

kj said...

i am also having this kind of weather. high winds last week; now plenty of never-ending snow. i'm also more aware of my age and limitations: we need more help than in previous years, getting snow off the roof, clearing the driveway, keeping up with shoveling. in some ways we need more help, period. but in exchange for that we have more time. not a bad exchange :^)

your husband looks kind and handsome

i hope you stay warm and cozy and with power

love
kj

Amanda Summer said...

I would not want to be surprised by a wild animal under my car hood! Stay safe and warm, dear Rosaria.

Grandmother (Mary) said...

You are a hardy soul! Stay safe and warm.

Soumyendu said...

Now this is truly an alive post, Rosaria :)

Becky Jerdee said...

Frontier is right!!!! So much worse than where we are...I admire your fortitude, Rosaria!

yaya said...

You are right, we don't hear about these storms. I never knew how extreme and nasty they can be. You have to be made of hardy stock to live there! I would think, knowing you are seniors, that getting your meds wouldn't be a problem. It's not like you're going to be selling them on the street! Crazy. Knowing you, I can bet you have all the proper precautions and preparedness items for these events. Stay safe!

Ann Best said...

What you say about not being able to get meds anymore for emergencies such as this...I really love my outdated childhood world when people, at least where I lived in the west, looked out for each other. You DO live on a kind of frontier.

Rosaria: I have missed you and some others, but I am now back to blogging albeit on a more limited basis than when I was "younger." Life doesn't seem to get any easier....but that's life :)

You and your husband are indeed tough people. I admire you.

A Cuban In London said...

Hope you and yours are safe. Storms are nasty.

Greetings from London.

Heidrun Khokhar, KleinsteMotte said...

This year the storms here have been less vicious for us but worse elsewhere but we are stuck in a deep freeze.
Not so nice this Valentines Day.
I so get all the work that bad storns send out.

Midlife Roadtripper said...

I hope the storms have subsided. Most interesting how the wildlife adapts to the weather.

Spring is coming - I promise.

Dewena said...

Rosaria, at 71 I've been searching lately for more bloggers entering retirement, for wisdom or understanding about just the things you wrote about here. I'm not sure how I found your interesting blog but I see Becky in the comments so it might have been through her.

I wanted to follow where I can catch your posts. I wanted to let you know where I wouldn't be one of those who lurk and never comment--I've been reading in your label "Blogging"!

I hope that some help can be found for the neighbor you wrote about previously. I often wonder what would happen in another 10 years or so to us, if it were not for our own neighbor being our son and his wife, and 3 other children who would not let that happen. Even now I wonder how to make this house easier for me to keep up with and these acres easier for my husband to handle. But it's an old valley farm with unique privacy and so we will probably stay until we just can't.

Delighted to meet you,
Dewena