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Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Invasive Species and other thoughts.


How do we learn?
What do we pay attention to?
How do we change our ways?
How do we maintain best habits?
How do we support a healthy environment?

When you move from one area to another, as we all do at some times in our lives, we need to adapt, and to learn new ways of doing things. Here in Oregon, with so many rivers, wetlands, beaches and forests all around, people seem incongruous.  We are the invasive species.

It's good to find maps and instructions everywhere.
It's good to learn best habits.

24 comments:

Dawn said...

I have always felt the best way to enter...is to know what's expected first. Good thoughts here. Adapting to your environment before it disappears....

Brian Miller said...

we often expect the environment to change to us, or back engineer it to...i guess there in lies the difference...

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

I agree. We have to adapt.

Kate said...

There are so many issues here. Even indigenous species (like the beaver) alter their environment to meet their needs. The problem is that we, being a more "successful" species (at least in terms of breeding potential) have a much higher impact. Having intelligence which has allowed us to expand into new habitats also gives us some responsibility to preserve those habitats, to show good stewardship, and unlike the beaver, we have demonstrated that we are capable of the forethought it takes to sustain our environment while we continue to grow and expand.

The problem is one of attitude: that it doesn't have to be "ME" that thinks about conservation, that we have "dominion" over the Earth, and when it's used up God will grant us a new one, or that one piece of litter or a cigarette butt isn't going to hurt (while neglecting the cumulative effect of such thinking)

Linda Myers said...

In the Pacific Northwest it's easy to see how nature would do just fine without us, the "invasive species".

SG said...

Yes, without adapting we would have perished. I have been doing some reading on brain related stuff of late, and I got the impression that some things are hard-wired in our brains. However, without the right nurture, our nature can't help too much. It is a fascinating topic.

quilterliz said...

G'day Rosaria. We need to do everything we can to protect our environment and to open our eyes and look at what is around us and to realise that we can make a difference. Take care. Liz...

A Cuban In London said...

I have always felt like an intruder in the outdoors. That's why many time I just sit there and look at the world.

Great post. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

PS: You have a great taste in music. Sarah Vaughan is one of my favourites. :-)

Maggie May said...

We do have to adapt but its not always easy at first.
Maggie X

Nuts in May

becky said...

We are indeed "invasive"...not only in the outdoor world but also in respect to each other...for example, talking on cell phones in closed in spaces occupied by many people.

More respect for everything and everyone...thanks for the reminder, Rosaria.

Marguerite said...

Great post! It's either adapt or perish!

Hilary said...

So very true, Rosaria. We are indeed the invasive species. I think of that every time a neighbour speaks of wanting to kill pesty creatures such as raccoons. It's disheartening when people always put themselves ahead of the environment.

Phoenix said...

Rosaria - "It's good to learn best habits." Such a true statement! We must constantly learn to be respectful of our environment and our neighbors while we are being invasive, and these manners are the least we can do.

Great, thoughtful post. Love it.

Ann Best said...

How very important this is. We so need to do all we can to save our environment. Look at the fires now raging, probably from carelessness, or maybe malicious intent. It makes me cry.

the walking man said...

Here in the great lakes we have Zebra Mussels, Lamprey Eels, and now Asian Carp all invading and ruing the habitat for the native species.

Once something with no predator gets established the whole world changes for the habitat. People just don't seem to get it.

Pat transplanted to MN said...

Do we ponder more as we age here in retirement or do we simply have the luxury of more time to ponder and consider? Your post reminds me of an old PA Dutch saying,"We grow too soon old and too late smart..." so much to consider on our environment and yet so much to achieve and learn. Unfortunately we humans in our spreading wherever we will, invade and then expect nature and her wildlife to accommodate us. I'm thinking of the CA foothills where we lived 40+ years and the Mt. Lions were considered trouble, when it was us.

Terra said...

You are right, and now there are almost 7 billion of us and we are spreading everywhere. I think I will plant something today to help balance it out.

Dr. Kathy McCoy said...

Another thought-provoking post, Rosaria. We do need to learn good habits. (In Arizona, we're quickly losing pristine forest lands, endangered wildlife and homes because someone left an untended campfire to smolder, but, of course, the problem of humans as an invasive species is much more pervasive.)

Rob-bear said...

We are, indeed, the invasive species. Too bad more of us have not figured that out. If we did, we would walk with much more respect in creation.

karen said...

We are so horribly invasive, our species, and I really worry about everything to do with the environment, whilst also feeling pretty helpless sometimes!

I also really enjoyed your earlier post with the cranberry door, and the sea view windows right in the far far west..

Grandmother said...

Without insects the world would end. Without humans the world would thrive. Sad. May we adapt and learn our place in the order of things.

fernenland said...

Lol, you will know from my blog that I entirely agree that humans are an invasive species - the most insidious ones this planet has ever seen. But on the botanical front, I noticed a refreshing note of sanity in a call from '19 eminent ecologists' to review how we regard 'invasive species.' http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110608153538.htm
Nature doesn't recognize national boundaries. It's time we set such mental constructs aside too and focused more on what benefits the changing environment and what doesn't. That sort of enquiry extends into every last corner of our everyday lives. Thank you for raising such a thought-provoking subject.

Sophie Munns said...

Youve generated a great discussion Rosaria... thanks for this!
I posted also after reading Fernenland's link to Science Daily. She added a great comment there too! And linked to this!

RNSANE said...

I think we often forget that this earth is not ours to plunder and ruin!!! One of the most important things we must teach our children is to respect this planet, the environment and its inhabitants, human and otherwise.