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Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Following the Rivers


Coos Bay and Charleston are sixty miles north of Port Orford, up on Highway 101, about an hour away, on the Coos River.

It is the place where we go to shop and eat out.

On weekends we go see a movie, pick up groceries, buy tools and equipment, spend an entire day out of the house, especially when the weather is awfull and we suffer from cabin fever.

Coos Bay sits a bit inland on the Coos River, and the fishing village of Charleston sits at the mouth of the same river.  Coos Bay used to be a very important port for shipping lumber down to Eureka and San Francisco starting in the mid 1800's. Most towns on this south coast were set up for lumber harvest.  Besides military and provisions posts, towns were company towns, with one or two mills, trucks, stores and conveniences including small cottages all built to support the lumber industry.  There are some exciting stories about this area, about the lumber barons who ran and coordinated just about everything.  The beautiful gardens of Shore Acres were part of the summer residence of Mr. Simpson, a rich and prominent citizen with households in North Bend, Coos Bay, Charleston, Eureka and San Francisco. 





The sky was a bit unstable. Dark clouds kept many people indoors.




There are no ocean views on the way to Coos Bay.  Forests and ranches parallel the highway for hundreds of miles.

The entire state of Oregon still has unspoiled territories, wild rivers, roadless forests.
Most lumber mills have closed, as forests have been designated as State or Federal Natural Reserves.
The town of Port Orford is leading the way in preservation of these natural habitats.

Read the award winning books of Tim Palmer and Anne Vileisis, a husband and wife writing team residing here, supporting and promoting preservation and ecological balance:

Trees and Forests of America, by Tim Palmer
Rivers of America, by Tim Palmer
Discovering the Unknown Landscape, by Anne Vileisis
Kitchen Literacy, by Anne Vileisis


Deer, elk, bear and turkeys  share our roads. Artists, writers, scientists and conservationists inhabit our towns.

At night, city lights are dimmed or turned off, an ordinance allowing residents to enjoy the spectacular night skies. A wide rainbow of sheer white linen stretches from one end of the sky to the other,  a night sky Milky Way more spectacular than one can imagine guides our steps.

Driving sixty miles to do the weekly shopping is a small price to pay for all this beauty.

22 comments:

Diane said...

If I had to choose between Oregon and Cornwall, England, I'd be hard-pressed. Luckily (or unluckily, I guess), it's not an issue at the moment :)

Helen said...

... and this is the reason I love living in Oregon!

Fire Byrd said...

The thing about America for me it is just so big. I find that daunting coming from a tiny island in comparison. And when I drove down from Philly to somewhere in Virginia I couldn't believe the distance, the forest the space. It is a spectacular country. And one I love visiting.

Tiffany Norris said...

The books sound interesting! And I found you through a comment you left on one of my book reviews--maybe for Maggie's Southern Reading Challenge? Enjoy your blog!

Brian Miller said...

it has been far too long since i was in oregon...

Eva Gallant said...

We drove through Oregon on our cross country trek and I would have to say it is one of the most beautiful states!

Elizabeth Bradley said...

My heart belongs in Oregon.

Renee said...

It is so beautiful where you live and you could be the ambassador for Oregon.

When we meet get ready for a great big hug.

xoxo

RNSANE said...

Rosaria, even though you are in a neighboring state, I haven't spent nearly enough time in Oregon. Now I have the time, but not the money, for a leisurely road trip...isn't that always the way - but, perhaps, in the spring, I'll drive up toward Port Orford and have lunch with you.

Years ago, I did drive up from San Francisco to Seattle, stopping along the Oregon coast...what a fabulous trip that was = spectacular...and, twice, on a coastal Royal Caribbean cruise, we spent a day in Astoria...lovely little town.

Of course, I've been to Eugene a couple of times for conferences and to Portland and I love some of the wonderful Oregon wines.

tattytiara said...

I love dark sky ordinances - bravo! What a lovely place you live.

becky at abbeystyle said...

How lovely that you continue to see and appreciate the beauty of your location. Wisely, you never take it for granted.

Ribbon said...

You've made this area sound wonderful. Nothing beats the experience of nature.

x Ribbon

PS... i love the photo of the sky

ellen abbott said...

Although it is quite dark out at the country house (especially compared to the city), there are still personal sodium arc lights on people's houses (we live in a small neighborhood in the county...min 1/2 acre lots). One of my big disappointments about our country house. I wanted an unspoiled night sky.

She Writes said...

Being from California where city meets ocean, it is stunning to see Oregon where woods still meet the sea.

Marguerite said...

I've never been to Oregon, but I sure would love to go there. Looks so beautiful and amazing! Great photos!

Pseudonymous High School Teacher said...

My older sister and her husband lived in Coos Bay in the late 70's. Younger sis and I went up to visit them one summer. I loved it. Stunningly beautiful. They took us to a swimming hole in a river that was isolated and gorgeous. We ate oysters bbq'd on the grill that we bought off the docks one night.

Enchanted Oak said...

Look at how many people were affected by your simple post about where you live. Sure the place is gorgeous, but it's how you write about it. Have you ever thought about becoming a travel writer?

the walking man said...

Although it all sounds good
"At night, city lights are dimmed or turned off, an ordinance allowing residents to enjoy the spectacular night skies"

This more than anything else makes me want to be there.

Shadow said...

don't know how far that is in kilometres, but it still sounds pretty worthwhile to do...

Angela Recada said...

You do live in a beautiful part of the world. I adore the Pacific Northwest, and have fond memories of visiting the Coos Bay area. Someday, I hope to return for another visit.

Barry said...

Wow. How do you keep the entire population of the United States from coming to live there?

It sounds ideal!

And you sound extremely lucky.

Relyn said...

OH, a little piece of home. My husband and I lived in Tennessee when we met, but his family was all from Oregon. For our honeymoon we went to Oregon so that I could discover all its many delights. Including Coos Bay, actually. About a year or so later, we moved there. We're now in Missouri and happy. But, I never seem to get over missing beautiful, magical Oregon.