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Friday, May 15, 2009

Accommodations.

When we last visited our doctor, yes, hubby and I have the same primary physician, he gave us his diagnosis straight up. Then, he added, "There are millions of Americans walking around with the same disease, and don't know it."
Thanks, that made us feel so much better.

He was talking about Type 2 Diabetes. Elevated blood sugar seems to be a morbid condition that affects many people and they don't know they have it. Once we have this disease, it will slowly get worse. What we can do is to make various changes in our diet and lifestyle to slow down the damage that has already begun. It seems that all organs are now unionized against and no amount of mediation will change their course of action.

The pharmacist was a bit more upbeat, telling us that he too had the disease, but hey, ten years after the initial diagnosis and he still does not have to inject insulin. I gulped, twice. Injections? Oh no! I faint at the sight of needles. When my children had needed shots someone else had to take them to the doctor. When I needed shots, they had to cover my eyes, and then get me supine for an hour or so before I could walk normally again.

We went to classes. We learned about dieting, measuring and reading labels for every spoonful of food we ingest. No more runs to Dairy Queen for a Milk-Shake-Delux. No more pasta, pizza and other steaks to celebrate our golden years. Hubby learned about measuring his blood glucose. My turn will come soon enough, I was told.

So, I cleaned up an entire bathroom for hubby's comfort. We used to brush our teeth together at the end of the day. No more. He has to be alone to do his needling. I moved my make-up and tooth-cleaning components into my bathroom. His bathroom is bigger and has better lighting, and longer counters for all the paraphernalia. I do need to learn about needles though; I'm right behind him, the doctor had said, suggesting I could very well hit the mark as I write this. Then, with all that fainting I'd have to give up blogging.

There is one good part about all this. We are finally on the same page regarding diet and exercise. I don't have to cook two different meals. One can be split and eaten by two. And we need to maintain our muscle tone and expand energy, daily, rain or shine. That treadmill has to come out of the garage and face the television with the rest of the family, and we can save some money and do our own tree and lawn maintenance.

Thank God I still enjoy cooking, or this new accommodation could send me over that watery ramp.

31 comments:

Susan said...

Well, I know it's a bad deal, but somehow diabetes sounds romantic when you tell about it!

BTW, you asked how I got interested in 2012 - and I did leave you an answer on my blog that day:
"Well, several years ago I read a book about it that really intrigued me. It would be in my lifetime (God willing) and that seemed so fun."

Shadow said...

there's good news in the bad news after all, diet and exercise... you guys will beat it!

Reasons to be Cheerful 1,2,3 said...

What a pain. I'm pathetic about things like that too, I've even fainted having an x-ray!!

I have had to self inject in the past though and you do get used to it. Hopefully with all your healthy measures you won't need to though.

potsoc said...

Dear Rosaria, I was diagnosed with type 2 in 1997 and still going well enough, with some oral medication and, yes, watching the labels for so-called nutritional values. At 78 now I can't complain and I eat what my wife and other people eat, although smaller portions and avoid too fat and too sugary.
As that radio program used to repeat way back when:"Shmile Luigi, it's not the end yet".

Elizabeth Bradley said...

A reminder, we need to take care of ourselves. My step-mother had juvenile onslaught diabetes and I took care of her until her death. I had to learn to give her shots, it was scary! A good friend got diagnosed with adult onslaught and lost 40lbs, gave up french fries, hamburgers and sweets and he isn't even on meds any longer. (I love my treadmill) Keep up the good work!

French Fancy said...

Get a dog, Rosaria. Walking is the best form of exercise and dogs are so lovely. I'm right with you on the needle phobia - I've been known to faint whilst watching someone give me a blood test

good luck with the new regime

La Belette Rouge said...

We did IVF for years and my husband gave me 5 shots a day. The needles brought us closer together. I am just saying, every cloud has a silver lining. Walks, chopping veg, and trips to farmers markets.

p.s. I actually miss getting the shots. We had little pre and post shot rituals. Strange what you can get used to.

Lola said...

I'm sure you'll beat the disease, because you have each other to sustain, to heal and to race in this little battle.

What a bummer about the diet restrictions, though. Now I see what you meant whan you'd say no thanks to all my chocolate temptations... Sorry.

Viva treadmills and cyclettes! And walking and fish and greens!! Ciao Maestra

Beth said...

I am so sorry BUT it sounds like you guys have the right attitude about the whole thing. Start eating right and exercising and you just may beat this thing.

And you just gave me the fuel I needed to now weasel out of the 5K I signed up for on Saturday.

Delwyn said...

Rosaria

It sounds like it is the time and the season to get out for some long walks.
and include some steps for bone density too...

Happy walking days

Katherine said...

We are adaptable creatures - a few changes, most for the better...

Gran said...

My mom lived with type 2 diabetes for years, mainly controlled by her diet. You can both do this! Granny-type side hugs to you both.

pink dogwood said...

my gut instinct says that you will do just fine. My dad had some elevated sugar levels few years ago. He started doing 1 hour of treadmill in the evening and special breathing exercises called 'Pranayam' for 30 minutes every morning. All of his numbers have come back to normal range.

Best wishes.

Helen said...

Dear Rosaria, You have provided a great public service and wake-up call today in coming forward with this news. If more of us (and that definitely includes me) stuck to the exercise and good diet plan, we would be a healthier nation.

Thank you for being so candid ... take care, enjoy life and let us know how things go. It's certainly a new chapter in your lives.

Woman in a Window said...

Rosaria, that sucks. Not going to sugarcoat it 'cause that'd probably send you into shock. It sucks. But it's not the end, perhaps just a new beginning. I wish you both well. (How did I get so behind reading you over here?)

Renee said...

Rosaria one of my sisters has diabetes too, actually two of them do.

They are both doing well.

xoxo

Michel said...

Crap - that honks! I'm sorry for you guys. Best of luck to you!!!

PS I tagged you on my blog. Participation is optional....

roentarre said...

Diabetes is a terrible diease. It has microvascular and macrovascular complications where the prognosis is not only compromised to a degree, it also renders significant morbidity with worsening quality of life.

Fire Byrd said...

The good thing is that the good stuff you do to ward Diabetes from getting worse becomes habit forming... good food,exercise and life stimulation can all take on a new and oh so good for you addiction!

karen said...

good luck, and yes, these new habits diet and exercise-wise are going to be great for both of you! I have to say, the idea of needles is scary, so wishing you both all the best! x

Kristin said...

Sharing diabetes sounds totally new to me! The changes sound like they can all be for the better - diet, exercise. You can live a whole new life!

I would miss trips for ice cream but I never really eat it anyway.

Tessa said...

Bravo, bravo, lakeviewer! It sounds to me that you've taken the problem and are running with it in the most intelligent and resourceful manner possible.

Ribbon said...

Take care
best wishes
Ribbon

Angela Recada said...

So sorry to hear about this, dear Rosaria. But with plenty of exercise and a strict diet, you can have a high quality of life.

My 82-year old father has been diabetic for years. My mother has him take many walks with her, they ride their stationary bikes together, and she has them both on a very healthy diet, so he does even need medication at this point. They feel very healthy and energetic and have a very good quality of life, and so can you and your husband.

I wish you all the best!
Angela

Natalie said...

Rosaria, my stepfather has cancer, diabeties type II, high blood pressure etc. He changed his diet and swims and cycles / walks and within twelve months he is off almost all meds. Previously, he was taking twelve tablets a day, now down to four. :D

sallymandy said...

Oh, I'm sorry about this. And glad there's so much you can do about it now, and that it's not more serious. Thank you for this post. I learned a lot.

sallymandy

Mervat said...

The best thing about this condition is that it is manageable. Diet and exercise are key, as you know. At least you and your hubby can do these things together. But I hope you won't have to join him on the needle front.

My best wishes to you and hubby.
xo

Rob-bear said...

Rosaria:

There was a time when I had to give myself needles regularly (for something other than diabetes). One I got the hang of it, it wasn't too bad.

But as the others have said, being careful about your diet, and getting some exercise, are the best ways of managing (even eradicating) this "high nuisance value" situation. And getting a dog might be a good thing.

Good luck, and blessings.

Marilynne said...

I'm a type 2 diabetic. I do take shots. They aren't the worst thing in the diabetic world. The worst thing is feeling lousy because your diabetes isn't in control.

Don't feel like you have to lock the door when you take a shot. I took one at the restaurant today while I was waiting for my sandwich. The waitress came too soon. I told her " You caught me." She just grinned and said "No problem."

I refuse to let my diabetes keep me down. I've had it for 19 years now. I did Zumba today (aerobics with a latin beat) and tomorrow I'll do Curves (woman's gym).

I try to do what's good for me, but when I falter I don't beat myself up, I just try to do better.

Marilynne

A Woman Of No Importance said...

The stoical way in which you have both embraced your life-transplant is such an inspiration, Rosaria...

My mother and grandmother, and probably before that, had Type 2 Diabetes, so it's pretty much on the cards for me, if I don't lose weight, which I am trying to do at the moment (admittedly in fits and starts!).

I wish you well, and can I say without sounding patronising, that I am proud of you both.

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